Police Modify Cruiser Light Bars, New ‘Secret Weapon’ Could Save Lives

Police Modify Cruiser Light Bars, New ‘Secret Weapon’ Could Save Lives


For police officers who spend most of their
shifts on the side of the road as traffic zooms by at high speeds, inches can be the
difference between life and death. While many states and localities have laws
that require drivers to change lanes in order to avoid officers conducting a traffic stop,
visibility has always been a big problem. Now the New York State Police are testing
a new “secret weapon”: a seemingly normal light bar that transforms into a vertical
display, alerting drivers even farther away that they need to begin paying attention. The new light bars are only on a few cruisers
at this point, but officials hope to expand the program if it shows success. The device remains as a typical horizontal
bar until an officer activates it, at which point it rotates two arms upward. Without the light bars, drivers appear to
not notice police vehicles belonging to the New York State Police until it’s too late.
Stopped cruisers that have been trashed by others on the road appear to be a common staple
of the force’s social media posts. First responders and others working on roads
know the danger of traffic all too well. “It’s incredibly dangerous on the side
of the roadway, and most of the people don’t have any idea because they’ve never been
on the side of the road and if they have it’s only been for moments,” Trooper Mark O’Donnell
told WHEC-TV in Rochester. “But the police officers, the fireman, the
EMS people, it’s their 8 to 12-hour shift is in the roadway or on the side of the road
so give us a break.” Although these new devices appear to be normal
light bars at first glance, a single button transforms them into a potentially life-saving
configuration. The concept is fairly simple — a taller
light bar means stopped cop cars are more visible at greater distances. On roadways with high speed limits where reaction
time is everything, the extra few seconds could mean the difference between a trooper
going home at the end of the day or being sent to the hospital — or worse. If the program is a success, it’s likely
these new lights will become a common sight on the tops of police department equipment
across the nation. For officers serving their communities every
day, the improvement likely can’t come soon enough.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Releated